Simon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-17-2009, 07:51 AM
>
> All you need to do is move with Acronis Migrate Easy, and then go into the
> BIOS and set it to boot from the SATA drive. Then once you are sure
> everything has been cloned over, you can wipe the old drive and use it for
> files and backups.
>
Well, I'll try acronis, but the installation is failing, ("Failed to
register product...").

My firewall is not blocking anything, in any case, not sure why I need to
register a trial product.

Simon

Simon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-17-2009, 08:00 AM
> Well, I'll try acronis, but the installation is failing, ("Failed to
> register product...").
>
> My firewall is not blocking anything, in any case, not sure why I need to
> register a trial product.
>
> Simon
Well, looking at the forums, it seems to be a very common problem, (since
2006 by the looks of it).

A bit of a shame really, I wonder how many potential customers like me will
not go any further because of the red tape.
But I must admit, it did look good.

Simon

Synapse Syndrome
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-17-2009, 11:50 AM
Richie Hardwick <richiehardwick@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>
>> Thanks for the advice, there seem to be 2 very distinct schools of
>> thought here. one that it will improve the overall performance and
>> the other that it will not make much difference.
>
> I would tend to think the latter, and that you'll be disappointed in
> the results.

Do you also think that a processor from 2002 would be as fast as one from
2007? That was around the time drives of these sizes came out, IIRC.

The 500GB is going to be sunstantially faster for several reasons due to
technological advance. The biggest reason would be the areal density of the
platters.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_storage_density

Try benchmarking any drives you have using HD Tach to see the difference:

http://www.simplisoftware.com/Public...request=HdTach

You can probably find results for the mentrioned drives on Storage Review,
but I did not bother to try to find out what I already know.

http://www.storagereview.com/

ss.


RalfG
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-17-2009, 03:29 PM
Seagate has a downloadable Acronis based utility that makes moving the OS a
snap. Similarly one for Maxtor drives, which Seagate now owns.

"Rob Talley" <rjtalley@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
news:fv12n4pu8qc1cfs179fp3fl6rekpt4l05u@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 16 Jan 2009 23:27:05 +0200, "Simon" <spambucket@myoddweb.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Originally all I wanted was to backup the other 2 drives, but I wonder if
>>performance would not improve if I actually moved the OS onto the new hard
>>drive.
>>The new drive has 32Mb cache while the other have 8Mb but this apparently
>>does not mean anything in real terms.
>>
>>But installing a new OS takes time, (I have VISTA Ultimate), and I would
>>have to re-install just about everything, (office and so on).
>
> No way. You merely clone that drive to the new one.
>
> Google for freebie versions - or maybe your new drive came with
> cloning software.
Ken Blake, MVP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-17-2009, 06:56 PM
On Fri, 16 Jan 2009 23:27:05 +0200, "Simon" <spambucket@myoddweb.com>
wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I currently have 2x 120Gb HD (6Y120P0 ATA Device,
> http://computers.pricegrabber.com/hard-drives/m/636724/)
>
> I ve had them for about 2 years and there is nothing wrong with them as far
> as I can tell.
>
> But because they are 2 years old I bough another hard drive as 'backup' as I
> suspect they are going to start failing soon.

Two years old is not very old and there is no particular reason to
suspect imminent failure. However having a backup drive is a *very*
good thing to have, since you can always have a problem (of various
types of problems--drive crashes, sever power glitches, nearby
lightning strikes, virus attacks, user errors, theft of the computer,
etc.) and lose important files regardless of the age of the drives

Whatever drive or drives you use for backup, be sure that they are
external, not internal and stored separately from the computer.
Internal backup drives can very often fail simultaneously with the
original to most of the cause I mentioned above.

> So I bought a new 500Gb HD(ST3500320AS ATA,
> http://computers.pricegrabber.com/ha...oduct/sv=title).
>
> Originally all I wanted was to backup the other 2 drives, but I wonder if
> performance would not improve if I actually moved the OS onto the new hard
> drive.
> The new drive has 32Mb cache while the other have 8Mb but this apparently
> does not mean anything in real terms.
>
> But installing a new OS takes time, (I have VISTA Ultimate), and I would
> have to re-install just about everything, (office and so on).
>
> So, is it worth it? Will I see a marked difference between the two Hard
> drives?
>
> Is there a way I can use the new hard drive to 'speed-up' my system?

Putting Windows (and everything else) on the newer, bigger drive will
speed up the system. That's for two reasons:

1. Newer drives are almost always faster than older ones.

2. Bigger drives are faster than smaller drives. That's because the
drives are bigger in terms of their capacity, but their physical size
is the same. That means that everything is closer together and as a
result the heads will very often have less distance to move.

--
Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
Please Reply to the Newsgroup
Ken Blake, MVP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-17-2009, 07:01 PM
One additional point to what I said below. You asked "So, is it worth
it? Will I see a marked difference between the two Hard drives?"
Nobody can answer that for you definitively, since it depends on
several factors--the specific drives as well as how much you have on
the drives and how it's arranged there.


On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 11:56:46 -0700, "Ken Blake, MVP"
<kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote:
> On Fri, 16 Jan 2009 23:27:05 +0200, "Simon" <spambucket@myoddweb.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Hi,
> >
> > I currently have 2x 120Gb HD (6Y120P0 ATA Device,
> > http://computers.pricegrabber.com/hard-drives/m/636724/)
> >
> > I ve had them for about 2 years and there is nothing wrong with them as far
> > as I can tell.
> >
> > But because they are 2 years old I bough another hard drive as 'backup' as I
> > suspect they are going to start failing soon.
>
>
> Two years old is not very old and there is no particular reason to
> suspect imminent failure. However having a backup drive is a *very*
> good thing to have, since you can always have a problem (of various
> types of problems--drive crashes, sever power glitches, nearby
> lightning strikes, virus attacks, user errors, theft of the computer,
> etc.) and lose important files regardless of the age of the drives
>
> Whatever drive or drives you use for backup, be sure that they are
> external, not internal and stored separately from the computer.
> Internal backup drives can very often fail simultaneously with the
> original to most of the cause I mentioned above.
>
>
> > So I bought a new 500Gb HD(ST3500320AS ATA,
> > http://computers.pricegrabber.com/ha...oduct/sv=title).
> >
> > Originally all I wanted was to backup the other 2 drives, but I wonder if
> > performance would not improve if I actually moved the OS onto the new hard
> > drive.
> > The new drive has 32Mb cache while the other have 8Mb but this apparently
> > does not mean anything in real terms.
> >
> > But installing a new OS takes time, (I have VISTA Ultimate), and I would
> > have to re-install just about everything, (office and so on).
> >
> > So, is it worth it? Will I see a marked difference between the two Hard
> > drives?
> >
> > Is there a way I can use the new hard drive to 'speed-up' my system?
>
>
> Putting Windows (and everything else) on the newer, bigger drive will
> speed up the system. That's for two reasons:
>
> 1. Newer drives are almost always faster than older ones.
>
> 2. Bigger drives are faster than smaller drives. That's because the
> drives are bigger in terms of their capacity, but their physical size
> is the same. That means that everything is closer together and as a
> result the heads will very often have less distance to move.
>
> --
> Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
> Please Reply to the Newsgroup
--
Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
Please Reply to the Newsgroup
Simon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-18-2009, 01:56 PM
> Seagate has a downloadable Acronis based utility that makes moving the OS
> a
> snap. Similarly one for Maxtor drives, which Seagate now owns.
Thanks for that.

I moved the OS to the new drive, that took less than an hour.

As for performance, I am not sure, it 'looks' a tiny better faster.
But nothing jumps out and strikes me as a whole lot faster.

Simon.

Mike Hall - MVP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-18-2009, 09:26 PM
"Simon" <spambucket@myoddweb.com> wrote in message
news:%23gflhSXeJHA.556@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>
>> Seagate has a downloadable Acronis based utility that makes moving the OS
>> a
>> snap. Similarly one for Maxtor drives, which Seagate now owns.
>
> Thanks for that.
>
> I moved the OS to the new drive, that took less than an hour.
>
> As for performance, I am not sure, it 'looks' a tiny better faster.
> But nothing jumps out and strikes me as a whole lot faster.
>
> Simon.

Those who suggested that it would were being a little optimistic. You have
also lost a great external back up drive..


--
Mike Hall - MVP

Mike's Window - My Blog..
http://msmvps.com/blogs/mikehall/default.aspx




RalfG
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-18-2009, 10:00 PM
I don't imagine it would seem much faster. Your old drives are still quite
up to spec for ATA drives. Unless you went to SATA (any version) you
wouldn't detect much difference. If you test and compare the data transfer
rates you might see a difference in speeds.


"Simon" <spambucket@myoddweb.com> wrote in message
news:%23gflhSXeJHA.556@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>
>> Seagate has a downloadable Acronis based utility that makes moving the OS
>> a
>> snap. Similarly one for Maxtor drives, which Seagate now owns.
>
> Thanks for that.
>
> I moved the OS to the new drive, that took less than an hour.
>
> As for performance, I am not sure, it 'looks' a tiny better faster.
> But nothing jumps out and strikes me as a whole lot faster.
>
> Simon.
Simon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: New hard drive, shall I bother moving?
Posted: 01-19-2009, 03:49 AM
> Those who suggested that it would were being a little optimistic. You have
> also lost a great external back up drive..
>
I am not sure I understand, what external drive is that?

Simon

 
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