Permissions

Posted: 05-28-2006, 08:26 PM
I am new to Vista. Can someone explain why an administrator has to keep
granting permission for every little thing. Is there a way around it?

Permissions


Responses to "Permissions"

Andre Da Costa [Extended64]
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Permissions
Posted: 05-28-2006, 08:58 PM
You are are experiencing the new User Account Protection scheme.
Security is a strong point in Windows Vista, a new security feature called
User Access Control (UAC) enables a lock on administrative features
throughout the OS, making it more difficult for users to mess up areas of
the operating system that are vulnerable to attack or user accidents.
Whether it's Device Manager, Windows, System/System 32 folders or changing
account settings. Limited account users (now called Standard User) can
benefit from this very much, by getting more flexibility when it comes to
doing common task such as setting date and time or changing your account
password. For computers in public places I consider this beneficial and it
provides a better peace of mind for Administrators and even confidence for
inexperienced users when using the operating system, the major advantage
really is it brings awareness to what the user is doing and certain persons
will at least take the time to read the consequences of their actions before
they click "Allow". So in end, there is no excuse for running as
Administrator. So far, the status from the public on UAC is, it seems like a
highly annoying feature and trust me, it is at times. It's the first thing I
disable after I log into Vista for the first time. For me, I can manage the
consequences from turning it off, but I still see it as a benefit for the
novice, grandma or non computer savvy uncle who occasionally use their
computer and want to stay out of trouble every time they use it.



So, it's really a necessary annoyance, if you do know what you are doing,
you can disable UAC by clicking Start > All Programs > Run > type in
MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click Launch,
restart your system for the changes to take effect.
--
--
Andre
Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta


"Charlie" <Charlie@Nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:O51N$TpgGHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>I am new to Vista. Can someone explain why an administrator has to keep
>granting permission for every little thing. Is there a way around it?

Zack Whittaker
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Permissions
Posted: 05-28-2006, 09:03 PM
User Account Protection/Control:
http://www.vistabase.co.uk/welcome.p...rity/whatisuap

Turn off the annoying prompt:
http://www.vistabase.co.uk/welcome.p...ity/disableuap

--
Zack Whittaker
ZackNET Enterprises: www.zacknet.co.uk
MSBlog on ResDev: www.msblog.org
Vista Knowledge Base: www.vistabase.co.uk
This mailing is provided "as is" with no warranties, and confers no
rights. All opinions expressed are those of myself unless stated so, and not
of my employer, best friend, Ghandi, my mother or my cat. Glad we cleared
that up!

--: Original message follows :--
"Andre Da Costa [Extended64]" <andred25@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uacOKmpgGHA.3652@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> You are are experiencing the new User Account Protection scheme.
> Security is a strong point in Windows Vista, a new security feature called
> User Access Control (UAC) enables a lock on administrative features
> throughout the OS, making it more difficult for users to mess up areas of
> the operating system that are vulnerable to attack or user accidents.
> Whether it's Device Manager, Windows, System/System 32 folders or changing
> account settings. Limited account users (now called Standard User) can
> benefit from this very much, by getting more flexibility when it comes to
> doing common task such as setting date and time or changing your account
> password. For computers in public places I consider this beneficial and it
> provides a better peace of mind for Administrators and even confidence for
> inexperienced users when using the operating system, the major advantage
> really is it brings awareness to what the user is doing and certain
> persons will at least take the time to read the consequences of their
> actions before they click "Allow". So in end, there is no excuse for
> running as Administrator. So far, the status from the public on UAC is, it
> seems like a highly annoying feature and trust me, it is at times. It's
> the first thing I disable after I log into Vista for the first time. For
> me, I can manage the consequences from turning it off, but I still see it
> as a benefit for the novice, grandma or non computer savvy uncle who
> occasionally use their computer and want to stay out of trouble every time
> they use it.
>
>
>
> So, it's really a necessary annoyance, if you do know what you are doing,
> you can disable UAC by clicking Start > All Programs > Run > type in
> MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click Launch,
> restart your system for the changes to take effect.
> --
> --
> Andre
> Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
> Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
> Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
> http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
>
>
> "Charlie" <Charlie@Nowhere.com> wrote in message
> news:O51N$TpgGHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>I am new to Vista. Can someone explain why an administrator has to keep
>>granting permission for every little thing. Is there a way around it?
>
>

Charlie
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Permissions
Posted: 05-29-2006, 02:14 PM
I certainly don't want to boot twice every time I use my PC. There should
be a way to disable this feature for people that know what they are doing. I
don't need to be "protected" . I understand the need for UAC, and even
making it the default setting, but it shouldn't be forced down peoples
throats. This one feature alone would make me hesitant to switch from XP.

"Andre Da Costa [Extended64]" <andred25@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uacOKmpgGHA.3652@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> You are are experiencing the new User Account Protection scheme.
> Security is a strong point in Windows Vista, a new security feature called
> User Access Control (UAC) enables a lock on administrative features
> throughout the OS, making it more difficult for users to mess up areas of
> the operating system that are vulnerable to attack or user accidents.
> Whether it's Device Manager, Windows, System/System 32 folders or changing
> account settings. Limited account users (now called Standard User) can
> benefit from this very much, by getting more flexibility when it comes to
> doing common task such as setting date and time or changing your account
> password. For computers in public places I consider this beneficial and it
> provides a better peace of mind for Administrators and even confidence for
> inexperienced users when using the operating system, the major advantage
> really is it brings awareness to what the user is doing and certain
> persons will at least take the time to read the consequences of their
> actions before they click "Allow". So in end, there is no excuse for
> running as Administrator. So far, the status from the public on UAC is, it
> seems like a highly annoying feature and trust me, it is at times. It's
> the first thing I disable after I log into Vista for the first time. For
> me, I can manage the consequences from turning it off, but I still see it
> as a benefit for the novice, grandma or non computer savvy uncle who
> occasionally use their computer and want to stay out of trouble every time
> they use it.
>
>
>
> So, it's really a necessary annoyance, if you do know what you are doing,
> you can disable UAC by clicking Start > All Programs > Run > type in
> MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click Launch,
> restart your system for the changes to take effect.
> --
> --
> Andre
> Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
> Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
> Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
> http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
>
>
> "Charlie" <Charlie@Nowhere.com> wrote in message
> news:O51N$TpgGHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>I am new to Vista. Can someone explain why an administrator has to keep
>>granting permission for every little thing. Is there a way around it?
>
>

Andre Da Costa [Extended64]
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Permissions
Posted: 05-29-2006, 07:53 PM
All I can say is, it is currently a work in progress and Microsoft realizes
that and changes are being made, hopefully subsequent builds will be much
better. In the mean time, if it bothers you:
click Start > All Programs > Run > type in
MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click Launch,
restart your system for the changes to take effect.
--
--
Andre
Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta


"Charlie" <Charlie@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:uxuvuoygGHA.3572@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>I certainly don't want to boot twice every time I use my PC. There should
>be a way to disable this feature for people that know what they are doing.
>I don't need to be "protected" . I understand the need for UAC, and even
>making it the default setting, but it shouldn't be forced down peoples
>throats. This one feature alone would make me hesitant to switch from XP.
>
> "Andre Da Costa [Extended64]" <andred25@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:uacOKmpgGHA.3652@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> You are are experiencing the new User Account Protection scheme.
>> Security is a strong point in Windows Vista, a new security feature
>> called User Access Control (UAC) enables a lock on administrative
>> features throughout the OS, making it more difficult for users to mess up
>> areas of the operating system that are vulnerable to attack or user
>> accidents. Whether it's Device Manager, Windows, System/System 32 folders
>> or changing account settings. Limited account users (now called Standard
>> User) can benefit from this very much, by getting more flexibility when
>> it comes to doing common task such as setting date and time or changing
>> your account password. For computers in public places I consider this
>> beneficial and it provides a better peace of mind for Administrators and
>> even confidence for inexperienced users when using the operating system,
>> the major advantage really is it brings awareness to what the user is
>> doing and certain persons will at least take the time to read the
>> consequences of their actions before they click "Allow". So in end, there
>> is no excuse for running as Administrator. So far, the status from the
>> public on UAC is, it seems like a highly annoying feature and trust me,
>> it is at times. It's the first thing I disable after I log into Vista for
>> the first time. For me, I can manage the consequences from turning it
>> off, but I still see it as a benefit for the novice, grandma or non
>> computer savvy uncle who occasionally use their computer and want to stay
>> out of trouble every time they use it.
>>
>>
>>
>> So, it's really a necessary annoyance, if you do know what you are doing,
>> you can disable UAC by clicking Start > All Programs > Run > type in
>> MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click Launch,
>> restart your system for the changes to take effect.
>> --
>> --
>> Andre
>> Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
>> Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
>> Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
>> http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
>>
>>
>> "Charlie" <Charlie@Nowhere.com> wrote in message
>> news:O51N$TpgGHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>>I am new to Vista. Can someone explain why an administrator has to keep
>>>granting permission for every little thing. Is there a way around it?
>>
>>
>
>

Charlie
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Permissions
Posted: 05-29-2006, 08:44 PM
I am a slow learner. I just figured out you don't have to go through this
process every time you boot. It's a one time process. Also figured out their
is a check box in Control Panel/User Accounts/Change Security Settings to
turn off/on UAC.

"Andre Da Costa [Extended64]" <andred25@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:O521dm1gGHA.3956@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> All I can say is, it is currently a work in progress and Microsoft
> realizes that and changes are being made, hopefully subsequent builds will
> be much better. In the mean time, if it bothers you:
> click Start > All Programs > Run > type in
> MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click Launch,
> restart your system for the changes to take effect.
> --
> --
> Andre
> Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
> Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
> Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
> http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
>
>
> "Charlie" <Charlie@nowhere.com> wrote in message
> news:uxuvuoygGHA.3572@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>>I certainly don't want to boot twice every time I use my PC. There should
>>be a way to disable this feature for people that know what they are doing.
>>I don't need to be "protected" . I understand the need for UAC, and even
>>making it the default setting, but it shouldn't be forced down peoples
>>throats. This one feature alone would make me hesitant to switch from XP.
>>
>> "Andre Da Costa [Extended64]" <andred25@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:uacOKmpgGHA.3652@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> You are are experiencing the new User Account Protection scheme.
>>> Security is a strong point in Windows Vista, a new security feature
>>> called User Access Control (UAC) enables a lock on administrative
>>> features throughout the OS, making it more difficult for users to mess
>>> up areas of the operating system that are vulnerable to attack or user
>>> accidents. Whether it's Device Manager, Windows, System/System 32
>>> folders or changing account settings. Limited account users (now called
>>> Standard User) can benefit from this very much, by getting more
>>> flexibility when it comes to doing common task such as setting date and
>>> time or changing your account password. For computers in public places I
>>> consider this beneficial and it provides a better peace of mind for
>>> Administrators and even confidence for inexperienced users when using
>>> the operating system, the major advantage really is it brings awareness
>>> to what the user is doing and certain persons will at least take the
>>> time to read the consequences of their actions before they click
>>> "Allow". So in end, there is no excuse for running as Administrator. So
>>> far, the status from the public on UAC is, it seems like a highly
>>> annoying feature and trust me, it is at times. It's the first thing I
>>> disable after I log into Vista for the first time. For me, I can manage
>>> the consequences from turning it off, but I still see it as a benefit
>>> for the novice, grandma or non computer savvy uncle who occasionally use
>>> their computer and want to stay out of trouble every time they use it.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> So, it's really a necessary annoyance, if you do know what you are
>>> doing, you can disable UAC by clicking Start > All Programs > Run > type
>>> in MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click
>>> Launch, restart your system for the changes to take effect.
>>> --
>>> --
>>> Andre
>>> Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
>>> Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
>>> Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
>>> http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
>>>
>>>
>>> "Charlie" <Charlie@Nowhere.com> wrote in message
>>> news:O51N$TpgGHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>>>I am new to Vista. Can someone explain why an administrator has to keep
>>>>granting permission for every little thing. Is there a way around it?
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Mike Lombrozo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Permissions
Posted: 05-31-2006, 06:26 PM
You stated . . . So in end, there is no excuse for running as Administrator .
.. . This isn't true because basic Windows tasks, such as copying files to a
CD and defragging a hard drive, require Admin rights. It's not helpful to
inform users that a process requires higher permissions, but won't elevate
the permissions beyond those already granted to the user. On the other hand,
it would be helpful to inform users that a task requires higher permissions
than they already have and automatically display the "Run as . . . " dialog
box.

"Andre Da Costa [Extended64]" wrote:
> You are are experiencing the new User Account Protection scheme.
> Security is a strong point in Windows Vista, a new security feature called
> User Access Control (UAC) enables a lock on administrative features
> throughout the OS, making it more difficult for users to mess up areas of
> the operating system that are vulnerable to attack or user accidents.
> Whether it's Device Manager, Windows, System/System 32 folders or changing
> account settings. Limited account users (now called Standard User) can
> benefit from this very much, by getting more flexibility when it comes to
> doing common task such as setting date and time or changing your account
> password. For computers in public places I consider this beneficial and it
> provides a better peace of mind for Administrators and even confidence for
> inexperienced users when using the operating system, the major advantage
> really is it brings awareness to what the user is doing and certain persons
> will at least take the time to read the consequences of their actions before
> they click "Allow". So in end, there is no excuse for running as
> Administrator. So far, the status from the public on UAC is, it seems like a
> highly annoying feature and trust me, it is at times. It's the first thing I
> disable after I log into Vista for the first time. For me, I can manage the
> consequences from turning it off, but I still see it as a benefit for the
> novice, grandma or non computer savvy uncle who occasionally use their
> computer and want to stay out of trouble every time they use it.
>
>
>
> So, it's really a necessary annoyance, if you do know what you are doing,
> you can disable UAC by clicking Start > All Programs > Run > type in
> MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click Launch,
> restart your system for the changes to take effect.
> --
> --
> Andre
> Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
> Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
> Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
> http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
>
>
> "Charlie" <Charlie@Nowhere.com> wrote in message
> news:O51N$TpgGHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> >I am new to Vista. Can someone explain why an administrator has to keep
> >granting permission for every little thing. Is there a way around it?
>
>
>
Gerry Hickman
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Permissions
Posted: 05-31-2006, 08:42 PM
Hi Mike,

Mike Lombrozo wrote:
> You stated . . . So in end, there is no excuse for running as Administrator .
> . . This isn't true because basic Windows tasks, such as copying files to a
> CD and defragging a hard drive, require Admin rights.
I wasn't in the thread, but I'll comment on this part.

1. There's no excuse for anyone to run with Admin rights
2. Copying files to a CD does NOT require Admin rights
3. Defragging a drive is an Admin task, the user should not be allowed

Some clarification:

I run a big network and none of us have Admin rights, not even the
developers. Running with Admin rights is totally stupid, and it's no
wonder people end up with Viruses and SpyWare when they do so,
especially idiots who use IE to go on the internet with Admin rights. I
run Admin tasks from command prompts if I need to manage something on
the network.

However, Microsoft Windows is badly designed, and some things like
ActiveX won't work without Admin rights, so WindowsUpdate or MSDN
downloads might not work - this is silly, because it means Microsoft are
pushing people into having to run with Admin rights! As I understand it,
they've decided Admin rights will be the default in Vista!?! No doubt
it's to pacify home users so they can easily install software without
having to switch to an Administrative account.

Security strategy is easy, Linux know how to do it perfectly, but
Windows has been deliberately flawed by Microsoft for the sake of
home-user convenience.

EXCEPT, it's not convenient, because now they need constant UAC pop-ups
and a resource hogging Anti-Spyware monitor.

Vista is the most botched security I've ever seen. The worst of both
worlds, and most hackers (and people like the RIAA) will simply bypass it.

There's a special newsgroup for Vista Security, probably best to use it
for security stuff in future.

--
Gerry Hickman (London UK)
Andre Da Costa [Extended64]
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Permissions
Posted: 05-31-2006, 11:21 PM
Actually all of the task you mentioned do no require Administrator
priviledges, defragging already don't automatically by the system.
--
Andre
Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
"Mike Lombrozo" <Mike Lombrozo@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:27B4B0ED-AEDE-4FD7-A1B8-B106CB864587@microsoft.com...
> You stated . . . So in end, there is no excuse for running as
> Administrator .
> . . This isn't true because basic Windows tasks, such as copying files to
> a
> CD and defragging a hard drive, require Admin rights. It's not helpful to
> inform users that a process requires higher permissions, but won't elevate
> the permissions beyond those already granted to the user. On the other
> hand,
> it would be helpful to inform users that a task requires higher
> permissions
> than they already have and automatically display the "Run as . . . "
> dialog
> box.
>
> "Andre Da Costa [Extended64]" wrote:
>
>> You are are experiencing the new User Account Protection scheme.
>> Security is a strong point in Windows Vista, a new security feature
>> called
>> User Access Control (UAC) enables a lock on administrative features
>> throughout the OS, making it more difficult for users to mess up areas of
>> the operating system that are vulnerable to attack or user accidents.
>> Whether it's Device Manager, Windows, System/System 32 folders or
>> changing
>> account settings. Limited account users (now called Standard User) can
>> benefit from this very much, by getting more flexibility when it comes to
>> doing common task such as setting date and time or changing your account
>> password. For computers in public places I consider this beneficial and
>> it
>> provides a better peace of mind for Administrators and even confidence
>> for
>> inexperienced users when using the operating system, the major advantage
>> really is it brings awareness to what the user is doing and certain
>> persons
>> will at least take the time to read the consequences of their actions
>> before
>> they click "Allow". So in end, there is no excuse for running as
>> Administrator. So far, the status from the public on UAC is, it seems
>> like a
>> highly annoying feature and trust me, it is at times. It's the first
>> thing I
>> disable after I log into Vista for the first time. For me, I can manage
>> the
>> consequences from turning it off, but I still see it as a benefit for the
>> novice, grandma or non computer savvy uncle who occasionally use their
>> computer and want to stay out of trouble every time they use it.
>>
>>
>>
>> So, it's really a necessary annoyance, if you do know what you are doing,
>> you can disable UAC by clicking Start > All Programs > Run > type in
>> MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click Launch,
>> restart your system for the changes to take effect.
>> --
>> --
>> Andre
>> Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
>> Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
>> Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
>> http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
>>
>>
>> "Charlie" <Charlie@Nowhere.com> wrote in message
>> news:O51N$TpgGHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> >I am new to Vista. Can someone explain why an administrator has to keep
>> >granting permission for every little thing. Is there a way around it?
>>
>>
>>
Gordon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Permissions
Posted: 06-22-2006, 11:24 AM
The enforcement of these messages is absolutely daft. These kind of things
should be disabled by default but with a capability for turning on clearly
easy to do. You HAVE to run a lot of stuff with admin rights they just plain
do not work so M$ need to understand that and allow for it.

"Andre Da Costa [Extended64]" wrote:
> Actually all of the task you mentioned do no require Administrator
> priviledges, defragging already don't automatically by the system.
> --
> Andre
> Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
> Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
> Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
> http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
> "Mike Lombrozo" <Mike Lombrozo@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:27B4B0ED-AEDE-4FD7-A1B8-B106CB864587@microsoft.com...
> > You stated . . . So in end, there is no excuse for running as
> > Administrator .
> > . . This isn't true because basic Windows tasks, such as copying files to
> > a
> > CD and defragging a hard drive, require Admin rights. It's not helpful to
> > inform users that a process requires higher permissions, but won't elevate
> > the permissions beyond those already granted to the user. On the other
> > hand,
> > it would be helpful to inform users that a task requires higher
> > permissions
> > than they already have and automatically display the "Run as . . . "
> > dialog
> > box.
> >
> > "Andre Da Costa [Extended64]" wrote:
> >
> >> You are are experiencing the new User Account Protection scheme.
> >> Security is a strong point in Windows Vista, a new security feature
> >> called
> >> User Access Control (UAC) enables a lock on administrative features
> >> throughout the OS, making it more difficult for users to mess up areas of
> >> the operating system that are vulnerable to attack or user accidents.
> >> Whether it's Device Manager, Windows, System/System 32 folders or
> >> changing
> >> account settings. Limited account users (now called Standard User) can
> >> benefit from this very much, by getting more flexibility when it comes to
> >> doing common task such as setting date and time or changing your account
> >> password. For computers in public places I consider this beneficial and
> >> it
> >> provides a better peace of mind for Administrators and even confidence
> >> for
> >> inexperienced users when using the operating system, the major advantage
> >> really is it brings awareness to what the user is doing and certain
> >> persons
> >> will at least take the time to read the consequences of their actions
> >> before
> >> they click "Allow". So in end, there is no excuse for running as
> >> Administrator. So far, the status from the public on UAC is, it seems
> >> like a
> >> highly annoying feature and trust me, it is at times. It's the first
> >> thing I
> >> disable after I log into Vista for the first time. For me, I can manage
> >> the
> >> consequences from turning it off, but I still see it as a benefit for the
> >> novice, grandma or non computer savvy uncle who occasionally use their
> >> computer and want to stay out of trouble every time they use it.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> So, it's really a necessary annoyance, if you do know what you are doing,
> >> you can disable UAC by clicking Start > All Programs > Run > type in
> >> MSCONFIG > Tools (tab) > scroll down select Disable UAC > click Launch,
> >> restart your system for the changes to take effect.
> >> --
> >> --
> >> Andre
> >> Windows Connected | http://www.windowsconnected.com
> >> Extended64 | http://www.extended64.com
> >> Blog | http://www.extended64.com/blogs/andre
> >> http://spaces.msn.com/members/adacosta
> >>
> >>
> >> "Charlie" <Charlie@Nowhere.com> wrote in message
> >> news:O51N$TpgGHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> >> >I am new to Vista. Can someone explain why an administrator has to keep
> >> >granting permission for every little thing. Is there a way around it?
> >>
> >>
> >>
>
 
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